Interview with Tony From Tony FED Fitness, Evolved Exercise, Nutrition, and Lifestyle Information

By on November 26, 2014
Photo by Tony Fed Fitness.

Photo by Tony Fed Fitness.

Recently, I sat down with one of my Paleo running role models, Tony from Tony FED Fitness, a blog of Evolved Exercise, Nutrition, and Lifestyle InformationMy ever-evolving interest in running has escalated the past few years, and its marriage alongside the Paleo diet has garnered some very interesting, very positive results. To give you guys a better sense of how to move forward in your running and weight loss career, Tony FED Fitness lends essential strategy for how to eat, how to alter your running habits, and how to trust your body to continue, mile after mile.

Check it out!

MEG:

On your blog, you note that you used to go through series of sugar binges followed by low-fat, “health” binges alongside many more miles of running. (So many people relate to that, of course.) Did you note a shift in the number of miles you did when you went Paleo?

Tony FED Fitness:

I definitely changed my running habits after going Paleo. When “burning calories” was my goal, I used to push my body to the point of injury. Now, running with ease, efficiency, and pleasure is my objective. Don’t get me wrong, I still run hard, but I only run hard when it’s working. If pain starts to flare up, I pay attention to it and dial things down, adjust my stride, or simply walk the rest of the way. My weekly mileage is also way less than it used to be. I’m in it for the long haul now.

MEG:

This coincides with the previous question. Many Paleo dieters state that simple sprints a few times a week offer enough cardio to your lifestyle. Would you agree with this statement? Or do you think long runs really make a difference in the Paleo lifestyle?

Tony FED Fitness:

I think that long runs, when done right, are totally Paleo and a great form of exercise. That being said, running longer should only be the goal when you can run short distances well. Even with super short sprints, poor technique can wreck your body and quickly put you out of commission. I think that good running form should be the first and foremost goal. With good form, you can run short and fast, or long and slow, depending on how you feel and how your body is recovering.

MEG:

How did you alter your stride when you switched to the Five Finger Vibram shoes? (For my fellow runner-readers looking to make the switch.)

 Tony FED Fitness:

This gets to my point about good form. If strangers think elephants are stampeding every time you run by, you are doing something wrong because an efficient stride is relatively quiet.  Modern running shoes encourage “elephant strides” because all that cushioning tricks your body into thinking that it’s OK to run with bad form. Take your shoes off and see if you run heel to toe. It’s not going to happen. You’ll take two steps before your feet stop you dead in your tracks. The reason I like Vibram Five Fingers is that they give you the feel of running barefoot without the need for a lifetimes worth of calluses. With Five Fingers, you can develop a natural mid-foot to forefoot stride (a slow jog will put you on your midfoot while fast running and sprinting brings you up to the balls of your feet) without wrecking your feet in the process. Don’t expect to run the same mileage with Vibrams though, you have to think of the switch as “Day 1″. Someone who has run with modern running shoes all their life, like me, has honestly never learned to run and transitioning into a natural stride can take years. I’ve been at it for over four years now and I’m just now getting to the point where I feel like my stride is where it needs to be.

MEG:

I get a ton of questions about low carb versus Paleo diets. Of course, as a runner, you need to refuel with a certain amount of carbohydrates. Which Paleo carbohydrates do you recommend for your post-run snack?

Tony FED Fitness:

Before and during my runs I don’t really stress about carb-loading and never have. Even in my pre-paleo days I wouldn’t bring carbohydrate gels or other supplements with me, even on long runs. I think most of us have ample bodyfat to get us through a run or a race. If you’re a carbaholic however, you’ll probably be less efficient at fat-burning, which is why I would recommend gradually reducing carbs and increasing healthy fats like avocado, coconut oil, and animal fats during your training period leading up to a race. I do think that carbs are important for recovery so post-run or race, eating bananas, cold baked sweet potatoes, and even cold baked potatoes as well as coconut water are great sources of glycogen replenishing carbs.

MEG:

If you were a new runner AND a new Paleo dieter, what would you tell yourself?

Tony FED Fitness:

Go all in but at your level. Get rid of your regular running shoes but walk before you run. Ditch the junk food, diet sodas, and even “healthy” crap like granola bars but don’t think you need to be eating beef liver on day one. Think of Paleo as hitting the reset button. You’re starting over completely with a focus on giving your body the best chance possible at health. I saw something the other day and it said something like, “Treat your body like someone you love.” and I think that’s a great reminder for what this is all about.

Again, check out Tony’s Evolved Exercise, Nutrition, and and Lifestyle Information blog, his truly insightful and nutritive Paleo recipes, and every lifestyle element in between!

Some rights reserved by antony_mayfield

Some rights reserved by antony_mayfield

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About Megan White

Megan White is a Paleo diet food fanatic running around the world, searching for the most nutritional tasty treats in every country she can find. Follow her on her journey as she dodges sugar cravings, works to better her mind and body, and picks up some creative Paleo diet recipes along the way.

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